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October 3, 2019

NYT Op-Ed Poses Wood Building & Forest Conservation as Climate Solutions

Common Ground High School

An op-ed in the New York Times, co-authored by Harvard Forest director David Foster, points to new forest management standards, increases in wood building projects, and protection of existing forests from development as untapped climate solutions in New England and around the world.

The piece was written with colleagues Frank Lowenstein from the New England Forestry Foundation and

September 1, 2019

Museum Event to Explore the Ecology of Towns & Villages

On Tuesday, September 17, Richard Forman, a renowned landscape ecologist and long-time research collaborator of the Harvard Forest, will present his new book on the ecology of towns and villages in a free public lecture in the Fisher Museum, beginning at 7:00 p.m. Those who can't attend this talk in person can catch the live-stream of

July 20, 2019

New Tweeting Tree Is Climate Change Storyteller

This month, Harvard Forest launched the first tweeting tree in North America. 

The project has been years in the making. The 100-year-old red oak tree first came into the spotlight in 2017, as the focal point for the climate change book Witness Tree, written by visiting Bullard Fellow Lynda Mapes. In 2018, post-doctoral fellow Tim Rademacher (from Northern Arizona University and

July 19, 2019

Registration Open for Schoolyard Ecology Teacher Workshop

Schoolteachers of grades 2-12 are invited to register for the Summer Institute for Teachers, held here at Harvard Forest on August 22 from 9:30am to 3:30pm. The cost is $50, which includes teacher materials, project supplies, and year-round support from educators and scientists at the Forest.

The Harvard Forest Schoolyard Ecology Program, now in its 16th year, works with teachers

June 18, 2019

2019-2020 Bullard Fellows Announced

We are pleased to announce the Harvard Forest Charles Bullard Fellows for 2019-2020. The mission of the Bullard Fellowship Program is to support advanced research and study by individuals who show promise of making an important contribution--either as scholars or administrators--to forestry and forest-related subjects, from biology to earth sciences, economics, politics, law, and the arts and humanities. 

June 10, 2019

New Grant: Gypsy Moth, Carbon Storage, and Tree Mortality

Gypsy moth caterpillar

A Harvard Forest-led research team has received a $99,000 Rapid Response Research grant from the National Science Foundation to study the factors underlying widespread oak tree mortality across southern New England in the wake of an ongoing, multi-year outbreak of invasive gypsy moth. 

It has been more than thirty years since gypsy moth has caused such a high level of tree

May 29, 2019

HF Scientists Featured in "Poetry in America" Course for Teachers

Poetry in America for Teachers logo

This spring, 194 K-12 teachers from around the nation enrolled in an online course featuring three Harvard Forest ecologists discussing poems related to their research. The online course is part of the Poetry in America project, created and directed by Harvard professor Elisa New -- a public television series and multi-platform digital initiative that brings poetry into classrooms

May 20, 2019

HF Graduate Students Earn Plant Biology Research Awards

Two Harvard Forest-affiliated graduate students have won research awards from the New England Botanical Club, to support their proposals to study the impacts of global change on garlic mustard invasions and the survival and diversity of native trees.

April 4, 2019

Bullard Spotlight: Tom Sherry on the Evolution of Bird Communities

Charles Bullard Fellow Thomas Sherry, who studies terrestrial bird migration, community structure, and conservation at Tulane University in New Orleans, used his six-month residency at the Forest to begin a book on the co-evolution and community-driven specialization of tropical birds and insects.

His unique integration of evolutionary approaches with ecological processes like predator-prey interactions and interspecific competition has led to

March 26, 2019

Study: Land Conservation Boosts Local Economies

Land conservation modestly increases employment rates, a traditional indicator of economic growth, according to a new study of New England cities and towns, led by scientists at Harvard Forest, Amherst College, Highstead, and Boston University.

The study, published in Conservation Biology, is the first of its kind, estimating the local net impacts of both private and public land conservation

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