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October 2009

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Thursday, October 1, 2009

New Harvard Forest Publication: Effect of Observers on Estimates of Infestation of Invasive Species

Hemlocks by stream

The growing threat posed by invasive species has focused increased attention on the importance of documenting the spread of introduced organisms. However, labor-intensive surveys are often required to monitor populations of invasive species and thus methods have been developed to estimate the true extent of an invasion using a sample of sites.

Thursday, October 1, 2009

New Harvard Forest Publication: Climate Change Shown in Paleo Record in Southwestern CT

Records of past environmental variability provide insights into how ecosystems respond to climate change. In a study published in the Journal of Quaternary Science, Harvard Forest researchers Wyatt Oswald, David Foster, Elaine Doughty, and Ed Faison analyze a lake-sediment record from southwestern Connecticut to reconstruct changes in climate, hydrology, and vegetation at the beginning and end of the Younger Dryas event (13,000-11,600 years ago). Pollen and sedimentary evidence suggest that the New England climate became warmer and drier at the onset of the Holocene.

Thursday, October 1, 2009

2009-2010 Harvard Forest Bullard Fellows in Forest Research

Harvard Forest is pleased to announce the 2009-2010 Charles Bullard Fellows in Forest Research. The purpose of this fellowship program, established in 1962, is to support advanced research and study by persons who show promise of making important contributions, either as scholars or administrators, to forestry defined in its broadest sense as the human use and study of forested environments.

Thursday, October 1, 2009

"Discover" Carnivorous plants

The recent paper published in American Journal of Botany by former post-doc Jim Karagatzides and Senior Ecologist Aaron Ellison (see September highlights) was featered in a slide show on Discovery News, the website of the Discovery Channel.