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March 2009

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Sunday, March 1, 2009

Twentieth Annual Harvard Forest Ecology Symposium

Pisgah Tree

The twentieth annual Harvard Forest Ecology Symposium will be held March 17, 2009 from 9:00am - 5:00pm at the Harvard Forest. This year's symposium will feature talks and discussion on synthesizing Harvard Forest LTER research.

Sunday, March 1, 2009

Harvard Forest collaborates to help protect 1865 acres through the Quabbin Corridor Connection Forest legacy project

Quabbin in mist

A partnership led by Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust working with Harvard Forest, Massachusetts Audubon Society, many landowners, the towns of Petersham and Phillipston, state agencies (DCR and DFG) and the U.S. Forest Service has completed the Quabbin Corridor Connection Forest Legacy project, which protects 1865 acres and provides critical links to protected corridors in the North Quabbin region. 

Sunday, March 1, 2009

New Harvard Forest Publication: A Review of Carnivorous Plants

Darwin sketches

In Honor of Charles Darwin, A Review of Carnivorous Plants

As part of the festivities surrounding the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of his book On the origin of species by means of natural selection, the Journal of Experimental Botany commissioned a series of review articles on topics about which Darwin wrote books.

Sunday, March 1, 2009

New Harvard Forest Publication: Climate Change, Invasive Species & Northeastern Forests

Climate models predict that by 2100, the northeastern U.S. and eastern Canada will warm approximately 3-5°C, with increased winter precipitation. These changes will affect trees directly and indirectly through effects on "nuisance" species, such as insect pests, pathogens, and invasive plants. Harvard Forest Ecologist Dave Orwig and Population Ecologist Kristina Stinson recently joined a team of colleagues to review how basic ecological principles can be used to predict nuisance species' responses to climate change and how this is likely to impact northeastern forests.