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January 2005

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Saturday, January 1, 2005

Long-Term Hydrological Studies Initiated

With funding from NSF and the Harvard Center for the Environment, the Forest has begun long-term studies of two small headwater Weir Intallationstreams on the Prospect Hill Tract. On Nelson Brook, weirs were installed on the two outlets of the 11-ha Black Gum Swamp. On Bigelow Brook, the existing culvert below the 3-ha Beaver Swamp was repaired, and a pipe installed in the stream channel 300m above the Swamp.

Saturday, January 1, 2005

New Harvard Forest Publication: Outreach To Family Forest Owners

The increasing number of family forest owners presents a challenge to effective outreach. Family woodland in some parts of the country represents the dominant ownership type. Sustained provision of a host of greater social goods and services depends on functional forest landscapes, yet fragmentation and parcelization of family woodlands pose a threat. Segmentation of the family owner audience into different types, and targeting of outreach toward two specific decision making junctures, may improve our ability to reach this important audience. 

Saturday, January 1, 2005

Harvard Archaeology Course Uses Forest as Classroom

This past September, Harvard Forest was the site of a lively field archaeology course run by Noreen Tuross, Clay Professor of Noreen Tuross Archaeology CourseScientific Archaeology at Harvard University. Ten students, two teaching fellows and Professor Tuross intensively sampled the Pierce Farm, investigating signals of past land use in phosphorus, DNA, and soil pollen. Many of the analyses were run on-site at the John G. Torrey Laboratory.