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August 2005

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Monday, August 1, 2005

Harvard Forest Master's Student receives Honorable Mention for Outstanding Thesis in the Biological Sciences

Brooks Mathewson, Masters' student in forestry, has been awarded the Dean's Prize Eastern Redback Salamanderfor Outstanding Thesis in the Biological Sciences, receiving an Honorable Mention for his research at the Harvard University Extension School Masters of Liberal Arts Program. Brooks' thesis advisors were Harvard Forest ecologists Betsy Colburn and David Foster, and Harvard Extension lecturers Amanda Benson and James Morris.

Monday, August 1, 2005

Forests in Time: Now Available in Paperback

"Forests in Time represents the cutting edge of efforts to create a truly historical approach to ecological science, and should be read by anyone who cares about the past, present, and future of terrestrial ecosystems."

- William Cronon, Author of Changes in the Land and Nature's Metropolis

Monday, August 1, 2005

New Harvard Forest Publication: Historical Human Impacts on Walden Pond

Multi-proxy analysis of a sediment core spanning 1600 years from Walden Pond, Massachusetts (USA), reveals substantial changes in the nutrient status over the past ∼250 years resulting from anthropogenic impacts on the lake and watershed. Following a period of environmental stability from about 430 AD to 1750 AD, the abundance of the diatom Cyclotella stelligera increased, the chrysophyte cyst to diatom ratio decreased, organic content declined, bulk organic δ13C decreased, and bulk organic δ15N increased.

Monday, August 1, 2005

New Harvard Forest Publication: Nutrient Limitation and Stoichiometry In Carnivorous Plants

Harvard Forest Senior Ecologist Aaron Ellison, along with University of Vermont Professor Nick Gotelli and his graduate students Amy Wakefield and Sarah Wittman examined Ecology August 2005 Covernutrient stoichiometry of northern pitcher plants fed supplemental prey. Their results suggest that under current conditions of high nitrogen deposition in the northeast that pitcher plants are phosphorus limited, and that phosphorus is preferentially absorbed from prey.