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July 2009

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Wednesday, July 1, 2009

Director, David Foster, Appointed to Massachusetts Climate Change Committee

David R. Foster was appointed by Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Secretary Ian Bowles to the newly formed Climate Change Adaptation Advisory Committe. The Committee will advise the Commonwealth on strategies for adapting to sea level rise, warming temperatures, increased incidence of flood and drought and other predicted effects of climate change. Members are experts from business, academia, and nonprofit organizations, who will meet periodically and report their findings to the Legislature by December 31, 2009. 

Wednesday, July 1, 2009

Harvard Forest Schoolyard Teachers Honored

Two Harvard Forest Schoolyard Ecology Teachers received Awards for Excellence in Energy and Environmental Education from The Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EOEA). Secretary Ian Bowles presented the awards to Lisa Shluger of the Fuller Middle School in Framingham and Tiffany Davis of the J.R. Briggs Elementary School in Ashburnham in the Great Hall at the Massachusetts State House.

Wednesday, July 1, 2009

Earth Day Lecture at Harvard Center for the Environment

Harvard Forest Senior Ecologist Aaron Ellison gave the Earth Day lecture at the Harvard University Center for the Environment in their Biodiversity, Ecology, and Global Change Lecture Series on the topic of "Assembling and restoring ecosystems in a rapidly changing world."

Wednesday, July 1, 2009

Ragweed and Future Climate Change: Putting the Where and When on Wheezing

Harvard Forest ecologists Kristina Stinson and David Foster, in collaboration with Dr. Chris Rogers from the University of Massachusetts School of Public Health, have been awarded $1M from the US Environmental Protection Agency to study the effect of global change on ragweed and human health.

Wednesday, July 1, 2009

New Harvard Forest Publications: American Beech Distribution and Disturbance Dynamics

Posy Busby with American Beech Tree

Fagus grandifolia (American Beech) is uncommon along the coast of southern New England, but occasionally forms unusual monodominant stands with higher beech abundance than is typical for inland areas. In this new publication, Posy Busby (former HF MFS student) and HF collaborators document the distribution of beech on Cape Cod and nearby coastal islands, and evaluate environmental and historical factors that influence its distribution.