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December 2006

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Friday, December 1, 2006

Director Receives New England Wild Flower Society Conservation Award

David Foster, Director of Harvard Forest, received the 2006 New England Wild Flower Society Massachusetts State Conservation Award. NEWFS LogoHe was honored for guiding the development of Harvard Forest from a small academic outpost to a major research site and for changing the way biologists interpret landscape patterns and ecological processes. The award emphasized Dr.

Friday, December 1, 2006

"Green" Garage designed and built at Harvard Forest

Wood's Crew at the garage

The building was designed and built entirely by the Harvard Forest woods crew using Harvard Forest wood products wherever possible. It is also, at the initiative of the crew, a "green building." This includes the composting toilet, a dual fuel wood/oil burner, and reusing materials from previous renovations. They also took the lead in submitting a grant to the state for a solar power system to provide about 8% of the electrical needs for all the Prospect Hill research projects which will be installed in the spring.

Friday, December 1, 2006

Report Outlines Funding to Conserve Half of Massachusetts’s Land

Harvard Forest's Wildlands and Woodlands proposal to conserve roughly half of Massachusetts as protected lands has received a boost from a new report detailing seven strategies to finance the ambitious proposal. The new report is the product of a recent Wildlands and Woodlands Conservation Finance Roundtable.

Friday, December 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Ragweed and Historical Climate Change

The environmental drivers behind abundant ragweed pollen in sediments of four southern New England lakes 10,000-8000 years ago were investigated. They found strong evidence that high levels of ragweed pollen were associated with warmer, drier conditions. This conclusion is corroborated by independent lake level and climate reconstructions. Together, these results have implications for future ragweed distribution and abundance, and suggest that more ragweed pollen could accompany rising temperature and CO2 levels in New England.