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August 2008

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Friday, August 1, 2008

New Harvard Forest Publication: Structural Comparisons of Old and Second Growth Hemlock Forests

Old-growth forests are valuable sources of ecological, conservation, and management information, yet these ecosystems have received little study in New England, due in large part to their regional scarcity. To increase our understanding of the structures and processes common in these rare forests, former REU (2000) and Ph.D. (2007) student Tony D'Amato along with HF ecologists David Orwig and David Foster studied the abundance of downed coarse woody debris (CWD) and snags and live-tree size-class distributions in 16 old-growth hemlock forests in western Massachusetts.

Friday, August 1, 2008

Scientist featured in Science Magazine

Kate Stinson

Harvard Forest Scientist Kristina Stinson recently talked with Science Magazine about her career path and her work on invasive plants at Harvard Forest. The profile was part of journalist Elisabeth Pain's series on forest ecology. Read the entire article. 

Friday, August 1, 2008

Climate Change: a Retrospective Look

The National Science Foundation has awarded $465,000 for a collaborative research project involving scientists from Harvard Forest, Emerson College, Brown University, and the University of Wyoming. The research will explore the potential for abrupt shifts in species abundances and assemblages to result from interactions between gradual, long-term changes in climate and episodic drought, fire, or human activities. The retrospective project involves the use of complementary approaches to reconstruct past climate-ecosystem dynamics.

Friday, August 1, 2008

New Harvard Forest Publication: Agrarian Landscapes in Transition

New Book Examines the History of Agriculture, Ecological Change and Conservation across the U.S.

The introduction, spread, and abandonment of agriculture represents the most pervasive alteration of the earth's environment in recorded history. This new volume edited by Charles Redman from Arizona State University and David Foster from Harvard Forest, draws on research at six U.S.