News & Highlights

Last updated May 1, 2018

Bullard Spotlight: Isabelle Chuine on What Makes Spring Buds Burst

Several times a year, we feature research by one of Harvard Forest's Charles Bullard Fellows. This spring, we're highlighting Isabelle Chuine, a research director at CNRS (French National Center for Scientific Research), based at the Centre of Functional and Evolutionary Ecology in Montpellier.

Study: More Fire, Fewer Trees in Klamath Future

Biscuit Fire 2002 - photo by Thomas Link

Increasing fires and summer droughts caused by global warming are drastically changing a globally unique bio-region of northern California and southwestern Oregon, according to new research funded by the National Science Foundation and published today in the journal Scientific Reports.

Long-Term Data on Ants Reveal Forest Dynamics

Sydne Record with Summer Student Collecting Ants

When forests change, do the resident ants change, too?  Ecologists Sydne Record (Bryn Mawr), Aaron Ellison (HF), Tempest McCabe (HF 2015 Summer Student, now at Boston University), and Ben Baiser (University of Florida Gainesville) answer this question in a new paper in the journal Ecosphere

2018 Ecology Symposium Highlights 30 years of Long-Term Research

Highlights and new directions from 30 years of the Forest's Long-Term Ecological Research Program were the focus of the 2018 Harvard Forest Ecology Symposium, held on March 20 in the Fisher Museum. More than 120 attendees - scientists, students, and forestry/conservation professionals - filled the Museum, with more joining online for the live-stream. Speakers covered issues ranging from carbon cycling and conservation/science policy to forest insect pests and soil microbes.

Harvard Forest Science & Art on the Road: Shifting Sites Exhibition

RISD oepning of Shifting Sites Exhibit

Harvard Forest Fellow David Buckley Borden and Harvard Forest Senior Ecologist Aaron Ellison have taken Hemlock Hospice and a study model for a new sculpture, Warming Warning Walk, on the road to the Rhode Island School of Design as part of the group exhibition, Shifting Sites.

Grad Students in the Canopy and Online: Science in Real Life

Collecting leaves from canopy

Jess Gersony, a graduate student in Harvard University's Organismic and Evolutionary Biology (OEB) Department, studies how trees respond to drought at the Harvard Forest, and is the guest star of a new episode on the YouTube channel 'Science in Real Life.' Fellow OEB graduate student Molly Edwards is the creator and host of this channel, supported by a grant from the American Society of Plant Biologists for 10 episodes featuring the work of women plant biologists at leading research institutions across the country.