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September 2009

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Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Pitcher plants in the presses and on the road

Recent Harvard Forest post-doc Jim Karagatzides has published two papers based on his research with Harvard Forest Senior Sarcenia with Quaker MothEcologist Aaron Ellison. In the first, using stable isotope tracers in the field, Jim showed that Sarracenia purpurea can acquire nitrogen directly from amino acids, bypassing the inorganic nitrogen cycle on which most plants depend for their primary nutrient.

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Prospect Hill Wireless Network

Prospect Hill Wireless Network

The Harvard Forest has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to build a wireless network across the 400-ha Prospect Hill Tract, providing high-speed network access to a wide range of short and long-term experimental sites. The network will make it possible to monitor and control instruments and to collect and analyze data in real time, effectively creating an "outdoor laboratory and classroom" for researchers and students at Harvard, in the LTER Network, and in the larger scientific and educational community.

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Ants as ecological indicators

Harvard Forest Senior Ecologist Aaron Ellison spent a week at the beach, working with Parks Canada and the staff of Prince Edward Island (PEI) National Park on developing a monitoring protocol for using ant diversity as an indicator of ecological integrity of this coastal national park. The absence of exotic ants on PEI, but their presence in nearby Nova Scotia, suggested monitoring for the future occurrence of two exotic species - the pavement ant Tetramorium caespitum and the European fire ant Myrmica rubra. In New England, T.

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Harvard Forest to study impacts of Asian Longhorned beetle

Harvard Forest scientists Dave Orwig and David Foster were recently awarded a USDA Forest Health Management Cooperative Agreement to study vegetation data and associated tree cores from a forested area that was recently infested with an invasive pest, the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB; Anoplophora glabripennis). This invasive insect was recently discovered in Worcester, MA and is a serious threat to forest ecosystems in North America. The ALB is quite large (up to 1.5 inches long) and feeds on a variety of hardwood trees including maple, willow, elm, ash, poplar and birch.