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October 2005

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Saturday, October 1, 2005

New Harvard Forest Publication: Canopy Impacts Of The Hemlock Wooly Adelgid

Recent Bullard Fellow Bernhard Stadler, from the University of Bayreuth in Germany along with collaborators including Harvard Forest Ecologist David Orwig, examined the impacts of the introduced insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid on spatial and temporal canopy processes in New England hemlock forests. Results suggest that adelgid-induced changes in tree physiology, forest microbiology, and stand-level nutrient cycling occurred well in advance of either heavy infestation by the pest or the appearance of severe tree damage.

Saturday, October 1, 2005

US Postal Service Northeast Deciduous Forest Stamps Issued

The Postal Service has issued the Nature of America: Northeast Deciduous Forest Northeast Stampcommemorative souvenir stamp sheet. The sheet's reverse side provides the common and scientific names of the 27 animals and plants pictured on the front. The artist's rendition was modelled after Harvard Pond and was created with some input from Harvard Forest Staff. 

Saturday, October 1, 2005

Harvard Forest Web Site Highlights Science Behind Autumn Leaf Color Change

Harvard Forest website created by John O'Keefe and 2004 Bullard Fellow, David Lee, Sugar MapleFlorida International University, focuses on leaf color change. The site will provide a central repository for images, references and scientific explanations and theories relating to leaf pigment changes. Though this site focuses on the New England area, the science and impact of these studies if far reaching.

Saturday, October 1, 2005

New Harvard Forest Publication: Old-growth Forests on Wachusett Mountain

Forest Ecologist David Orwig documented approximately 100 acres of old-growth forest on the western slopes of Wachusett Mountain State Reservation in Princeton and Westminster, Massachusetts. This report contains information on tree ages and forest composition, as well as recommendations for protecting both the newly discovered forests and nearby existing old-growth forests on the Reservation.