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December 1, 2003

Outstanding Review Received for Long Term Ecological Research Program

DIRT

This July, Harvard Forest hosted a 5-person review team that looked at the progress of the Harvard Forest LTER program. The review emphasized the following areas:

  • Leadership in scientific collaboration and synthesis
  • Value of a historic perspective
  • Value of long-term biophysical measurements
  • Contributions of experiments at Harvard Forest
  • An educational program that fosters integration
  • Advances in information management
  • Current and new thrusts of LTER research

The Review team

December 1, 2003

New Harvard Forest Publication: Hurricane Impacts

Boose, E. R. 2003. Hurricane impacts in New England and Puerto Rico. Pp. 25-42 in Climate Variability and Ecosystem Response at Long-Term Ecological Research Sites. D. Greenland, D. G. Goodin and R. C. Smith, eds. Oxford University Press, New York.

December 1, 2003

New Harvard Forest Publication: Forests In Time

David R. Foster and John D. Aber, eds. Forests In Time: The Environmental Consequences of 1000 Years of Change in New England

Click here for this and other Harvard Forest publications available for purchase. 

November 1, 2003

Harvard Forest Land Protection Effort: The Wilson Project 2003 - 2004

The Issue

Harvard Forest has the largest and most comprehensive records of ecological change and human history for any site in NorthRiley's Field America. In the recent past, rural central Massachusetts has been bypassed by significant development leaving 90% forest cover and low population densities. However, today there has been a greater development pressure

November 1, 2003

New Harvard Forest Publication: Hurricanes across the Yucatán

Boose, E. R., D. R. Foster, A. Barker Plotkin and B. Hall. 2003. Geographical and historical variation in hurricanes across the Yucatán Peninsula. Pp. 495-516 in The Lowland Maya Area: Three Millennia at the Human-Wildland Interface. A. Gómez-Pompa, M. F. Allen, S. L. Fedick and J. J. Jiménez-Osornio, eds. Haworth Press, New York. 

October 1, 2003

Moose Sightings at Harvard Forest

Several people have reported seeing moose on Harvard Forest property on the Prospect Hill tract. Even if you don't see the moose Moose caution signitself, you may see signs of its presence:

  • Moose consume large quantities of willow, birch, and aspen twigs
  • Moose often browse on small saplings, tearing off twigs and sometimes breaking the
October 1, 2003

Schoolyard Coordinator added to Education Program at Harvard Forest

Harvard Forest LTER and The Fisher Museum have hired Pam Snow to act as Schoolyard Coordinator. Pam will focus on grades K - 12 Pam Snowand bring the lessons of the long term ecological research projects to the classroom as well as lead groups here through the Museum and the surrounding

September 1, 2003

Integrated studies of hemlock and hemlock wooly adelgid launched

HWA Hemlock

Across the eastern United States, hemlock is being killed slowly by the hemlock woolly adelgid, and rapidly by pre-emptive salvage logging. Investigators from the Harvard Forest, Harvard University, University of Bayreuth, University of California at Irvine, University of Massachusetts, University of New Hampshire, University of Vermont, and the Woods Hole Research Center have begun a long-term experimental study on how

September 1, 2003

Harvard Forest Fall Seminar Series Begins September 5th

The Harvard Forest seminars are an interdisciplinary forum for invited speakers to present research on a wide range of ecological topics. The fall series runs from September 5 through December 19. Lectures are free and open to the public and are held Fridays at 11:00am. September speakers include:

  • David Lindenmayer, Australian National University and Harvard Bullard Fellow speaking on Two decades

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