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May 1, 2006

Invasive Plants in the News

HF research on invasive plants demonstrates critical evidence that a noxious alien weed causes ecological damage in the Garlic mustard invasionNortheast

Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), an invasive plant that has spread across much of the U.S. harms native maples, ashes, and other hardwood trees by releasing chemicals harmful to a soil fungus the trees

May 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Identifying Types of Private Forest Ownership

Ecosystem-scale approaches to management in the eastern United States depend on the attitudes and behaviors of thousands of non-industrial private families and individuals whose ownership dominates landscapes. In Massachusetts, for example, it is estimated that the average ownership is 23 acres. Most ecosystem processes greatly exceed this very small average management unit. While there has been prior work on individual

April 1, 2006

17th Annual Harvard Forest Ecology Symposium

Harvard Forest Symposium Logo

The seventeeth annual symposium will be held Wednesday April 12, 2006 9:00am. A series of talks highlighting new research and cooperative carbon dynamics work.

April 1, 2006

Harvard Forest Master's Student Receives Bowdoin Prize

MFS student, Edward Faison was awarded Harvard University's Bowdoin Prize for Graduate Essays in the Natural Sciences for 2005-2006, an annual prize given for a paper of literary merit on any subject in the natural sciences. His essay, entitled "Extraordinary Accounts of the Common Ragweed," discusses ragweed pollen's unique role as an indicator of major environmental shifts in the New

April 1, 2006

Northeast NEON Meeting

NSF and NEONInc have released two reports and indicated that an RFP for a prospectus from each NEON Domain (region) will be coming out in 2-3 months, with the prospectus due in 6-9 months. Consequently, we are organizing a meeting for all individuals interested in the Northeast NEON effort.

Date: April 25, 2006
Location: Harvard Forest
Agenda: Overview of the NEON

April 1, 2006

Forest in Time Paperback Second Printing

The re-release of Forest in Time (FIT) in paperback coincides with the review of FIT in The Agricultural History Review by Forests In Time CoverGraeme Wynn of the University of British Columbia. He wrote:

"Let there be no mistake. This is a remarkable book. The product of close collaborations among fifty scholars devoted to

April 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Managing Different Types of Privately Owned Forest

We used a segmentation analysis which indicates a significant heterogeneity of private woodland owner attitudes in Massachusetts. We estimate roughly 67% of private woodland owners place highest priority on contemplative enjoyment and privacy provided by their properties. These "Henry David Thoreau" type owners are not necessarily opposed to management or utilization of wood from their land, but these activities are

April 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Land Use Change in North Carolina

In a recently released book, Harvard Forest researcher Robert McDonald co-authored a chapter on the causes and consequences of land-use change in the North Carolina Piedmont with D.L. Urban, E.S. Minor, and E.A. Treml. The project integrated studies of forest dynamics, conservation value (forest songbird communities), and ecosystem processes (watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry). As part of this modeling effort, they

March 1, 2006

Wildlands and Woodlands: Continuing the Vision

Some eight months after the report's release four major and complementary efforts have arisen to support this conservation vision, sustain its dissemination and promote its initial implementation. These include:

  1. A self-organized consortium of regional conservation organizations, state agency representatives, and foundations meeting at the Henry P. Kendall Foundation and Doyle Center for Conservation (TTOR) is seeking to promote the vision through:
March 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publications: Ragweed's Past & Future In New England

Kristina Stinson and Ed Faison took the lead on two Harvard Forest publications demonstrating that climate change increases the presence and abundance of ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) and its pollen. K. Stinson and F. Bazzaz tested whether elevated CO2 would benefit the growth and reproductive output of small plants over larger ones by growing experimental stands of competing ragweed individuals in

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