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April 1, 2007

Summer Institute for Teachers

The Harvard Forest offers a Forest Ecology training institute for teachers of grades 2-12. Learn how to implement field studies related to local ecosystems with your students right in your schoolyard.

Previous participants have recently posted new Data Analysis lesson plans developed by experienced Schoolyard Ecology teachers: Nichole Ruggles, Kellie Robichaud, Kathleen Bennett, and Mary Gagnon along with support from

April 1, 2007

Harvard Forest in the News

Christian Science Monitor highlights the return of moose to Massachusetts due to landscape change and return of forest. As land was Forest then and nowcleared for farms in the Northeast, moose and other wildlife fled. Now that the trees are back, the moose are, too. Read the article. 

April 1, 2007

New Harvard Forest Publication: Plant Life History of Coastal Sandplain Grassland Taxa

Coastal sandplain grasslands of New England harbor a number of rare plant species, but few systematic management techniques have been developed to help foster or restore these critical habitats. Farnsworth (2007) applied a comparative, functional group approach to coastal sandplain grassland taxa in order to examine whether rare plant species share certain aspects of rarity and life history characters that

March 1, 2007

Annual Harvard Forest Ecology Symposium

The eighteenth annual symposium will be held March 27, 2007 at the Harvard Forest. The symposium will focus on the expanding horizons in long-term ecological research: synthesis across the New England region and disciplinary boundaries.

March 1, 2007

Harvard Forest teams with local land trust and land owners to protect adjacent forest land.

The Harvard Forest has partnered with Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust, Keith Ross of LandVest, state conservation agencies and Protected Lands Maplocal land owners to permanently protect nearly 170 acres of forest in two large parcels adjacent to the Prospect Hill tract. This project advances our goal of maintaining the integrity of Harvard

March 1, 2007

New Harvard Forest Publications: Historical Land-Use And Its Impacts On Coastal Southern New England

Von Holle & Motzkin (2007) examined how previous land use and current biotic and environmental properties influence the abundance and distribution of nonnative plant species across coastal upland habitats of southern New England and adjacent New York. They found that the modern distribution of nonnative plants is influenced by multiple, interdependent current and historical factors. Open-canopy communities, such as grasslands,

February 1, 2007

Harvard Forest Announces New Research Course

In response to a University-wide call to expand small group, experiential study in the sciences, the Harvard Forest will launch a new Student on snowshoescourse and expand its summer research opportunities for Harvard Undergraduates this Spring. The new course, OEB 122 - Field Research in Ecology and Conservation, features

February 1, 2007

Harvard Forest in the Media

WBUR Radio recently visited Petersham and interviewed two Harvard Forest scientists to discus the infestation of hemlock trees by the Hemlock Wooly Adelgid Lateral Portraitinsect called hemlock woolly adelgid.

The Harvard University Alumni Quarterly Colloquy highlights Harvard Forest as a living laboratory. Read the article

February 1, 2007

New Harvard Forest Publication

Climate Change affected major forest ecosystems dynamics

The mid-Holocene decline of eastern hemlock is widely viewed as the sole prehistorical example of an insect- or pathogen-mediated collapse of a North American tree species and has been extensively studied for insights into pest–host dynamics and the consequences to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems of dominant-species removal. We report paleoecological evidence implicating climate as

January 1, 2007

New Funding for Global Change and Carbon Dynamics Research

The Terrestrial Carbon Program of the U.S. Department of Energy recently awarded approximately 1.5 million dollars for continued Sonic ATmeasurements of forest-atmosphere carbon exchange at Harvard Forest. A team of researchers from several departments at Harvard and from the State University of New York at Albany's Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (SUNY-ASRC), led by

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