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December 11, 2017

Boston Globe Features Hemlock Hospice Art Installation

Fast Forward - Hemlock Hospice Installation by David Buckley Borden

Harvard Forest and its Hemlock Hospice Art Installation was recently highlighted in the Boston Globe. The exhibit's elegy to the hemlock is described by Renée Loth in this excerpt: 

"Part sculpture, part pedagogy, part citizen science, the project speaks largely in artistic metaphor. But the popular Black Gum trail really is off-limits to the public, because its towering eastern hemlock trees

December 4, 2017

2018 Undergraduate Summer Research Program

2016 Summer Student Alex Widstrand inspects the above-canopy tram. Photo by Lauren Ebels.

Applications are now open for the 2018 Harvard Forest Summer Research Program, an opportunity for college and university students across the U.S. to participate in 11 weeks (May 21-August 3, 2018) of paid, independent research with mentors from Harvard and other leading institutions.

2018 research projects cover many academic disciplines, including ecology, biogeochemistry, computer science, conservation, history, and engineering.
Research

October 25, 2017

New Insights on Forests in a Changing Climate

How will climate change affect New England forests over the next century? According to a series of new studies from HF Senior Ecologist Jonathan Thompson's lab, the answer is a mixed bag. In some respects, climate will exert an even greater impact than we thought: longer growing seasons will mean more tree growth and carbon storage. In other ways, climate

October 24, 2017

Conservation Leader to Offer Public Seminar

On November 14 at 6:30 p.m. in the Fisher Museum, national conservation leader Rand Wentworth will offer a free public seminar on best practices for leadership in the complex process of conserving land. The event is open to the public, and especially geared towards community leaders, landowners, conservationists, and students.

Wentworth is the Louis Bacon Senior Fellow in

October 6, 2017

Study: Warmer Forest Soils Release More Carbon, Accelerating Future Warming

A new study in the journal Science reports on 26 years of data from the world’s longest-running forest soil warming experiment, based at the Harvard Forest since 1991. It suggests that in a warming world, a self-reinforcing and perhaps uncontrollable carbon feedback will occur between forest soils and the climate system, adding to the build-up of atmospheric

September 28, 2017

Pits and Mounds: Diminished Elements in a Second-Growth Landscape

Pits and mounds might be considered the charismatic microtopography of the forest. These features, vividly nicknamed 'pillows and cradles,' are formed by the uprooting of trees. In most forests, these features contribute important habitat diversity while varying soil processes. A new study in the journal Forest Ecology & Management, led by HF senior scientist Audrey Barker

September 19, 2017

New Report: Forests, Funding, and Conservation in Decline across New England

The Harvard Forest, Highstead, and authors from around New England have released a new report called “Wildlands and Woodlands, Farmlands and Communities," which broadens a 2010 Harvard Forest vision for conservation to permanently protect forests and farmlands as natural infrastructure that sustains both people and nature in the region. 

The report was released to the

September 6, 2017

Linking Science & Art: Hemlock Hospice

On Saturday October 7th, from 12 noon until 4 pm, the Harvard Forest will host an opening reception for the Hemlock Hospice art installation on the Prospect Hill Tract and feature prints, drawings and sculptures in science-communication in the Fisher Museum. This exhibition is the work of interdisciplinary artist and designer David Buckley Borden’s year-long collaboration

August 31, 2017

How Do We Measure Carbon?

Atticus Stovall with Faro Scanner

We know that forests store carbon, but how do we measure the carbon stored in trees without cutting them down? An international group of LiDaR (Light Detection and Ranging) scanning experts and forest scientists gathered at the Harvard Forest this August to compare scanning and destructive sampling methods to calculate tree volume, mass, and carbon. 

Most researchers use equations that estimate mass (and

August 29, 2017

Improving Approaches for Scientists and Stakeholders to Co-design Environmental Scenarios

Planning for the future involves overcoming uncertainty to anticipate the unknown. An increasingly popular approach for developing future plans while managing uncertainty is scenario development, whereby several consistent and coherent storylines are developed to reflect different hypotheses about how the future might unfold. In a new paper published online in the journal Ecology and Society by Marissa McBride

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