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Friday, February 1, 2008

Harvard Forest Schoolyard Students Give Presentation to the Mass. Secretary of Energy and the Environment

Schoolyard Presentation

Three sixth-grade students who participated in Harvard Forest Schoolyard Ecology projects in 3rd, 4th and 5th grades, gave a presentation to Ian Bowles, Secretary of Executive Office of Environmental Affairs (EOEA). The students from the JR Briggs Elementary School in Ashburnham shared their experiences in the field-based ecological research projects related to Vernal Pools, Leaf Phenology and the Hemlock Woolly Adeldgid. Fifth grade teacher, Kate Bennett, introduced the presentation along with Mary Marro of the Nashua River Watershed Association.

Friday, February 1, 2008

New Harvard Forest Publication: Invasive Species Distribution and Historical Land Use

Despite the recognized importance of historical factors in controlling many native species distributions, few studies have incorporated historical landscape changes into models of invasive species distribution and abundance. We surveyed 159 currently forested sites for the occurrence and abundance of Berberis thunbergii (Japanese barberry), an invasive, non-native shrub in forests of the northeastern U.S., relative to modern environmental conditions, contemporary logging activity, and two periods of historical land use.

Tuesday, January 1, 2008

Harvard Forest Schoolyard Ecology Participants win 2007 Teachers of the Year Awards

We are proud to announce that both the Massachusetts Audubon Society's and the Nashua River Watershed Association's 2007 Teacher of the Year awards were given to Harvard Forest Schoolyard Ecology participants!

Tuesday, January 1, 2008

New Harvard Forest Publication: Prey Availability and Its Effect On Carnivorous Plants

Former Harvard Forest Bullard Fellow Elizabeth Farnsworth and Harvard Forest Senior Ecologist Aaron Ellison examine scaling relationships among leaf traits of 10 species of pitcher plants (Sarracenia species) fed different quantities of insect prey. Increased prey availability increased photosystem efficiencey (as expressed by the ratio of Fv/Fm), chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic rate. It also led to a shift from P- to N-limitation in subsequently produced pitchers.

Tuesday, January 1, 2008

Harvard Forest Policy Analyst Receives Award from the Society of American Foresters

The New England section of the Society of American Foresters (SAF) has announced that David Kittredge has been elected Fellow to the Society for 2007. SAF recognizes members who have provided outstanding contributions to the Society over a sustained period and have distinguished themselves in the forestry profession with the title Fellow. There are only 38 Fellows in New England (out of a membership of 1,100) and this includes notably Dave's major professor at Yale University, Dr. David M.

Tuesday, January 1, 2008

LTER releases Decadal Science Plan

The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network, www.lternet.edu, has released its new Decadal Science Plan, which maps out the Network's science agenda for the next 10 years. Titled "Integrative Science for Society and the Environment(ISSE): A Plan for Research, Education, and Cyberinfrastructure in the U.S.

Saturday, December 1, 2007

New Harvard Forest Publication: Analytic Web Project

The Analytic Web project, a long-term collaboration between ecologists at Harvard Forest and computer scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, is developing methods to ensure that scientific data analyses are sound and reproducible. This paper considers how such methods might be applied to a complex, real-time system for measuring the movement of water through a small forested watershed at the Harvard Forest.

Saturday, December 1, 2007

New grant for climate change research

The Department of Energy has awarded $3.4 Million to a four-university consortium that includes Harvard University's Harvard Forest, North Carolina State, the University of Tennessee, and the University of Vermont for a four-year study of the effects of climate change on the ecological dynamics of ants and other soil invertebrates. In early 2008, ten 5-meter (16-foot) diameter open-top chambers will be installed at Harvard Forest and in North Carolina.

Saturday, December 1, 2007

New Harvard Forest Publication: The Effect of Land Conservation on Development

What effect do protected lands have on land conservation or development nearby in the surrounding landscape? Using information on land cover and land protection over time for three sites (western North Carolina, central Massachusetts, and central Arizona), this paper aimed to answer this question. At all sites, newly protected conservation areas tended to cluster close to preexisting protected areas. Land protection breeds more land protection. On the other hand, on two of our three sites the development rate was significantly greater in regions with more protected land.

Saturday, December 1, 2007

Centennial Edition - New England Forests Through Time

NE Forests Through Time Cover

The Harvard Forest Centennial Edition (1907-2007) reprinting of New England Forests Through Time: Insights from the Harvard Forest Dioramas is now available. Along with the diorama illustrations and interpretations that made the first printing so popular, this edition contains a new preface, "Forests Past, Present, and Future", and updated "Suggested Further Readings." Copies can be purchased. 

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