Press Resources: Clearcut Forest Impacts 10/18

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Press Release: Study: Forest Clearcuts Show Sustained Losses of Carbon, Surprising Trends in Water

Scientific Paper in Global Change Biology: "Post-clearcut dynamics of carbon, water and energy exchanges in a mid-latitude temperate, deciduous broadleaf forest environment"

Contacts: Clarisse Hart, Harvard Forest Outreach Manager (978-756-6157; hart3@fas.harvard.edu)
and Jane Salerno, Clark University Media Relations (508-793-7554; jsalerno@clarku.edu)

Photographs

(click images to download high-res)

Instrumentation. Photo by Chris Williams.Measuring the direct exchange of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and heat between the land and atmosphere in the clearcut area. Instruments shown here are a sonic anemometer and infrared gas analyzer. Photo courtesy of Christopher Williams of Clark University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clearcut regeneration over time. Photo by Chris Williams. Photo series documenting vegetation regrowth in the first three growing seasons following the fall 2008 clearcut of a former spruce plantation. Photo courtesy of Christopher Williams of Clark University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professor Williams measures the height of a tree sapling three years after the clearcut. Photo courtesy of Christopher Williams of Clark University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetation abundance measured in the field by Clark University Geography PhD candidate Melanie Vanderhoof (middle), with two undergraduate students majoring in environmental science: Graham Twibell and Angela Marshall. Photo courtesy of Christopher Williams of Clark University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professor Williams performs maintenance on instruments deployed in the clearcut to measure carbon, water, and energy fluxes between the land and atmosphere. Photo courtesy of Christopher Williams of Clark University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clark University environmental science students measuring the abundance of vegetation cover for each species in the clearcut site (left to right: Krittika Govil, Graham Twibell, and Angela Marshall). Photo courtesy of Christopher Williams of Clark University.