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Friday, April 1, 2005

Harvard Forest Environmental Historian wins award

Brian Donahue, Environmental Historian at Harvard Forest and Professor at Brandeis University, was just awarded the George Perkins The Great MeadowMarsh Award from the American Society of Environmental History for the Best Book in Environmental History. Previous winners include Bill Cronon, John Opie, and Art McEvoy. Brian's book is The Great Meadow: Farmers and the Land in Colonial Concord.

Friday, April 1, 2005

Producers Screen "The Greatest Good" - documenting 100 years of the U.S. Forest Service

Tuesday, April 26th at 6:30 PM: On Tuesday, April 26th, Harvard Forest will host a screening of "The Greatest Good", a documentary of The Greatest Goodthe U.S. Forest Service on its 100-year anniversary, in the Fisher Museum. The film's producers will be available at a reception with light refreshments at 6:30 pm. The film will begin at 7:00 PM.

Tuesday, March 1, 2005

New Harvard Forest Publication: Cooperation of Private Forest Owners

A relatively small number of non-industrial private forest (NIPF) owners in the United States has recently expressed interest in Forest Policy and Economics Covercooperating with one another at scales broader than their individual properties. There are many good reasons to do so, which would enhance their individual ownership benefits, as well as the suite of greater public benefits that accrue from a privately owned forest landscape.

Tuesday, March 1, 2005

Summer Research Program for Undergraduates Funding Extended

The REU Site Grant that Aaron Ellison and Kathleen Donahue submitted to support our Summer Research Program for Undergraduates2005 REU Interns B&W has been recommended for funding for 5 years. According to the program officer at NSF this will be the single largest REU award in biology in the history of the program. 

Tuesday, March 1, 2005

Land Protection Grant Recommended for Funding

Hemlocks

Our efforts to protect the boundary of Harvard Forest lands include a $3.7 million proposal in collaboration with the Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust to the USFS Forest Legacy Program, seeking funds to put conservation restrictions on 2100 acres of private land outside the Forest. That proposal has just been ranked 3rd of the 48 proposals nationally that have been recommended for funding.

Tuesday, February 1, 2005

New Harvard Forest Publication: Reconstructing Hurricanes

Boose, E. R. 2004. A Method for reconstructing historical hurricanes. Pages 99-120 in Hurricanes and Typhoons: Past, Present, and Future. R. Murnane and K. Liu, eds. Columbia University Press, New York. 

Tuesday, February 1, 2005

Sixteenth Annual Harvard Forest Ecology Symposium

Walkup Climber

Harvard Forest's annual ecology symposium, jointly sponsored by Harvard University's NIGEC and LTER Programs, will be held Wednesday, February 23. The meeting will include a series of synthetic talks outlining the developement, accomplishments, and future directions for science in the LTER and NIGEC programs. Presentations will highlight the effects of historical factors, climate forcing, pollution, and land-use on carbon dynamics, invasive species, and ecosystem structure and function. Synthesizing studies through modeling will be emphasized.

Tuesday, February 1, 2005

Cooperation with National Weather Service Continues

Rain Gauge

The National Weather Service (NWS) Cooperative Observer Program (COOP) recently installed a new precipitation gauge and temperature sensor at the Harvard Forest. Installation of the new system, which will upload data to the NWS via satellite every 15 minutes, continues many years of participation by the Forest in the COOP program. 

Saturday, January 1, 2005

New Harvard Forest Publication: Outreach To Family Forest Owners

The increasing number of family forest owners presents a challenge to effective outreach. Family woodland in some parts of the country represents the dominant ownership type. Sustained provision of a host of greater social goods and services depends on functional forest landscapes, yet fragmentation and parcelization of family woodlands pose a threat. Segmentation of the family owner audience into different types, and targeting of outreach toward two specific decision making junctures, may improve our ability to reach this important audience. 

Saturday, January 1, 2005

Harvard Archaeology Course Uses Forest as Classroom

This past September, Harvard Forest was the site of a lively field archaeology course run by Noreen Tuross, Clay Professor of Noreen Tuross Archaeology CourseScientific Archaeology at Harvard University. Ten students, two teaching fellows and Professor Tuross intensively sampled the Pierce Farm, investigating signals of past land use in phosphorus, DNA, and soil pollen. Many of the analyses were run on-site at the John G. Torrey Laboratory.

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