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Thursday, June 1, 2006

Undergraduate Research Experience Program Kicks Off

2006 REU Interns

22 summer students have arrived as part of the Harvard Forest summer research program in ecology. Students come from all over the United States to participate in on-going research projects including atmospheric pollution, global warming, hurricanes, treefalls, and insect outbreaks. Researchers come from many disciplines and institutions. Specific projects center on population and community ecology, paleoecology, land-use history, wildlife biology, biochemistry, soil science, ecophysiology, and atmosphere-biosphere exchanges. 

Thursday, June 1, 2006

Spring Leaf Out - 2006

Spring May 22

The photographs in the following presentation document the changes in forest trees at the margin of the pasture, adjacent to the headquarters of the Harvard Forest. These photographs were taken during spring of 2006 by John O'Keefe, and show the timing of the leaf out and leaf development this spring.

Thursday, June 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Conservation & Harvesting In Massachusetts

Forest harvesting is an important, ongoing disturbance that affects the composition, structure, and ecological function of the majority of the world's forests. However, few studies have examined the interaction between land-use conversion and harvesting. Harvard Forest researchers utilized a unique, spatially explicit database of all cutting events and land-cover conversions for Massachusetts over the past 20 years to characterize the interactions between land-use conversion and harvesting, and their relationship to physical, social, and economic factors.

Monday, May 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Identifying Types of Private Forest Ownership

Ecosystem-scale approaches to management in the eastern United States depend on the attitudes and behaviors of thousands of non-industrial private families and individuals whose ownership dominates landscapes. In Massachusetts, for example, it is estimated that the average ownership is 23 acres. Most ecosystem processes greatly exceed this very small average management unit. While there has been prior work on individual owner attitudes, there is little documented research exploring attitudes of owners towards cooperation at scales broader than their own properties.

Monday, May 1, 2006

2006-2007 - Charles Bullard Fellowship Recipients

The Charles Bullard fellowship program is to support advanced research and study by individuals who show promise of making an important contribution, either as scholars or administrators, to forestry and forest-related subjects from biology to earth sciences, economics, politics, administration or law. See the complete listing of Bullard Scholars from 1962 - the present. 

Monday, May 1, 2006

Invasive Plants in the News

HF research on invasive plants demonstrates critical evidence that a noxious alien weed causes ecological damage in the Garlic mustard invasionNortheast

Saturday, April 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Land Use Change in North Carolina

In a recently released book, Harvard Forest researcher Robert McDonald co-authored a chapter on the causes and consequences of land-use change in the North Carolina Piedmont with D.L. Urban, E.S. Minor, and E.A. Treml. The project integrated studies of forest dynamics, conservation value (forest songbird communities), and ecosystem processes (watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry). As part of this modeling effort, they estimated the uncertainties due to errors in imagery and ground data, model selection, parameter estimation, and process error.

Saturday, April 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Managing Different Types of Privately Owned Forest

We used a segmentation analysis which indicates a significant heterogeneity of private woodland owner attitudes in Massachusetts. We estimate roughly 67% of private woodland owners place highest priority on contemplative enjoyment and privacy provided by their properties. These "Henry David Thoreau" type owners are not necessarily opposed to management or utilization of wood from their land, but these activities are of a lesser priority compared to "Walden-like" qualities or benefits. We estimate roughly 23% of the woodland owner population share characteristics with John Muir.

Saturday, April 1, 2006

Forest in Time Paperback Second Printing

The re-release of Forest in Time (FIT) in paperback coincides with the review of FIT in The Agricultural History Review by Forests In Time CoverGraeme Wynn of the University of British Columbia. He wrote:

Saturday, April 1, 2006

Northeast NEON Meeting

NSF and NEONInc have released two reports and indicated that an RFP for a prospectus from each NEON Domain (region) will be coming out in 2-3 months, with the prospectus due in 6-9 months. Consequently, we are organizing a meeting for all individuals interested in the Northeast NEON effort.

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