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Sunday, October 1, 2006

NSF Awards Harvard Forest $4.9 Million to Study Landscape Change

Scientists to examine forest response to natural and human disturbances across northeastern U.S. The National Science Stone WallFoundation has awarded Harvard University's Harvard Forest $4.9 million to study drivers, dynamics, and consequences of landscape change in New England.

Sunday, October 1, 2006

Regional Forest Responses to Environmental Change

IUFRO Conference

International Union of Forest Research Organizations, Canopy Processes Working Group

A traveling workshop in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and New York, USA. October 6-13, 2006
Information: http://people.bu.edu/nathan/iufro_info.htm

Sponsors: Bartlett Experimental Forest, Black Rock Forest Consortium, Boston University, Harvard Forest, National Science Foundation, Northeastern Ecosystem Research Cooperative, University of New Hampshire, USDA Forest Service

Sunday, October 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Predicting Species Abundance After Habitat Loss

Plant and animal population sizes inevitably change following habitat loss, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are poorly understood. In a new study published in PLoS Biology, University of Vermont biology professor Nicholas Gotelli and Harvard Forest senior ecologist Aaron Ellison provide the first experimental confirmation that trophic structure can determine species abundances in the face of habitat loss.

Tuesday, August 1, 2006

Donations for The Harvard Forest Ecology K-12 Teacher Training Received

The "Friends of Harvard Forest" and an anonymous donor have provided generous support to our Schoolyard Ecology program. This funding will Schoolyard Vernal Pondallow us to provide scientific consultation and training to local K-12 teachers who are implementing field ecology studies related to Harvard Forest ecologist's research.

Saturday, July 1, 2006

Professor Emeritus Receives Centennial Medallion Award

Harvard Forest Professor Emeritus P. Barry Tomlinson received the Botany Society of America's Centennial Medallion Award. Professor Barry TomlinsonThe award honors those who have make significant contributions to the advancement of the botanical sciences as well as contributions to the Botanical Society of America. 

Saturday, July 1, 2006

Ph.D. student Sydne Record receives Gilgut Fellowship

Sydne Record, a Ph.D. student in the Plant Biology program at the University of Massachusetts who is doing her dissertation research at the Harvard Forest with Senior Ecologist Aaron Ellison, has received the 2006-2007 Gilgut Fellowship from the Plant Biology program. This fellowship provides a full year of stipend support and release from teaching so that Sydne can focus full-time on her disseration research on understory plants, ants, and ecosystem dynamics. 

Saturday, July 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Analytic Web Modeling

Ecologists are interested in synthesizing a diverse array of complex datasets to address novel ecological questions, but Winter Walkupactually synthesizing datasets to produce reliable and reproducible results is a challenging task.

Saturday, July 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Foliage Decomposition in Forests Affected By Hemlock Wooly Adelgid

Recent Research Assistant Richard Cobb, working with collaborators including Harvard Forest Ecologist David Orwig and former HF Summer Reserach Program student Steve Currie, examined the impacts of the introduced insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) on green litter decomposition in New England hemlock forests. This study investigated both the direct effects of HWA feeding and indirect changes in microclimate on foliar decomposition.

Saturday, July 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Moth Herbivory of Pitcher Plants

This paper summarizes the independent research project of 2004 Summer Research Program student Dan Atwater, in which he examined changes in the distribution of two noctuid moths that feed on pitcher plants at Tom Swamp. Large plants were preferentially attacked by larvae of Exyra fax but the pitcher-plant borer Papaipema appassionata was not so selective.

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