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Wednesday, March 1, 2006

Wildlands and Woodlands: Continuing the Vision

Some eight months after the report's release four major and complementary efforts have arisen to support this conservation vision, sustain its dissemination and promote its initial implementation. These include:

Wednesday, March 1, 2006

NEON Social Science Workshop Report

A Transformational Ecological Research Program To Interpret and Forecast Dynamics in the Coupled Human-Environment System Report of the NSF-Sponsored Workshop -- January 10-11, 2006 Harvard Forest, Harvard University

David Foster, Billie Turner, Morgan Grove, and Workshop Participants

Full Copy of Report 

Wednesday, March 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publications: Ragweed's Past & Future In New England

Kristina Stinson and Ed Faison took the lead on two Harvard Forest publications demonstrating that climate change increases the presence and abundance of ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) and its pollen. K. Stinson and F. Bazzaz tested whether elevated CO2 would benefit the growth and reproductive output of small plants over larger ones by growing experimental stands of competing ragweed individuals in climate-controlled open top chambers shown in photo.

Wednesday, February 1, 2006

Conservation finance roundtable and white paper funded

James Levitt (director of Program on Conservation Innovation at Harvard Forest) and Wildlands and Woodlands CoverKathy Lambert (president of Ecologic) received a grant to host a roundtable of national leaders in the area of conservation finance in Spring 2006. The goal is to indentify potential mechanisms for funding an ambitious regional land protection effort like Wildlands and Woodlands.

Wednesday, February 1, 2006

Managing Hemlock Forests threatened by Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Harvard Forest Ecologist David Orwig and Extension Forester David Kittredge from Managing Hemlock ForestsUmass-Amherst recently completed a fact sheet that reviews Hemlock Woolly Adelgid biology, silvicultural options, Best Management Practices, and considerations for making an informed decision about the future of hemlock stands.

Wednesday, February 1, 2006

Smith Conservation Fellowship Awarded to Harvard Forest Post Doc

Dr. Robert McDonald, currently of Harvard Forest, received The Society for Conservation Biology and the Cedar Tree Foundation 2006 Smith Conservation Research Fellowship. The David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellowship, the nation's premier post doctoral program in conservation biology, seeks to find solutions to the most pressing conservation challenges in the United States. Each Fellow's research is conducted in partnership with a major academic institution and an "on the ground" conservation organization to help bridge the gap between theory and application.

Sunday, January 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Conservation Finance

Levitt, J.N. (ed.). 2005. From Walden to Wall Street: Frontiers of Conservation From Walden to Wall Street CoverFinance. Island Press and Lincoln Institute.

Sunday, January 1, 2006

Five-Year Grant Funded

Sarracenia purpurea

The Division of Environmental Biology at the National Science Foundation has recommended that Harvard Forest Senior Ecologist Aaron Ellison's proposal "Moths, ants, and carnivorous plants: the spatial dimension of species interactions" be funded, beginning March 1, 2006. The goal of this 5-year, $585,000 research project, is to understand how species interactions change the spatial distribution of dynamic habitat patches across the landscape, and to determine how food webs are structured within and among these patches.

Thursday, December 1, 2005

New Harvard Forest Publication: Carnivorous Plants & Insects

An overview of interactions between carnivorous plants and insects published in the magazine of the Xerces Society, an international nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting biological diversity through invertebrate conservation. Jess Butler and Tony D'Amato came up with the title of the article. 

Ellison, A. M. 2005. Turning the tables: plants bite back. Wings, Fall 2005: 25-29.

Thursday, December 1, 2005

New Harvard Forest Publication: Effect of Fire On Ant Assemblages

In this paper by PIs and graduate students at Humboldt State University, University of Vermont, University of Tennessee, and Harvard Forest, we examined environmental factors controlling species composition of ant assemblages in fens and forests of the Siskiyou Mountains. We were especially interested in the response of these ant assemblages to the Biscuit Fire of 2002, one of the largest wildfires (>200,000 ha) recorded in Oregon.

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