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Saturday, July 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Foliage Decomposition in Forests Affected By Hemlock Wooly Adelgid

Recent Research Assistant Richard Cobb, working with collaborators including Harvard Forest Ecologist David Orwig and former HF Summer Reserach Program student Steve Currie, examined the impacts of the introduced insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) on green litter decomposition in New England hemlock forests. This study investigated both the direct effects of HWA feeding and indirect changes in microclimate on foliar decomposition.

Saturday, July 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Moth Herbivory of Pitcher Plants

This paper summarizes the independent research project of 2004 Summer Research Program student Dan Atwater, in which he examined changes in the distribution of two noctuid moths that feed on pitcher plants at Tom Swamp. Large plants were preferentially attacked by larvae of Exyra fax but the pitcher-plant borer Papaipema appassionata was not so selective.

Thursday, June 1, 2006

Undergraduate Research Experience Program Kicks Off

2006 REU Interns

22 summer students have arrived as part of the Harvard Forest summer research program in ecology. Students come from all over the United States to participate in on-going research projects including atmospheric pollution, global warming, hurricanes, treefalls, and insect outbreaks. Researchers come from many disciplines and institutions. Specific projects center on population and community ecology, paleoecology, land-use history, wildlife biology, biochemistry, soil science, ecophysiology, and atmosphere-biosphere exchanges. 

Thursday, June 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Conservation & Harvesting In Massachusetts

Forest harvesting is an important, ongoing disturbance that affects the composition, structure, and ecological function of the majority of the world's forests. However, few studies have examined the interaction between land-use conversion and harvesting. Harvard Forest researchers utilized a unique, spatially explicit database of all cutting events and land-cover conversions for Massachusetts over the past 20 years to characterize the interactions between land-use conversion and harvesting, and their relationship to physical, social, and economic factors.

Thursday, June 1, 2006

Spring Leaf Out - 2006

Spring May 22

The photographs in the following presentation document the changes in forest trees at the margin of the pasture, adjacent to the headquarters of the Harvard Forest. These photographs were taken during spring of 2006 by John O'Keefe, and show the timing of the leaf out and leaf development this spring.

Monday, May 1, 2006

2006-2007 - Charles Bullard Fellowship Recipients

The Charles Bullard fellowship program is to support advanced research and study by individuals who show promise of making an important contribution, either as scholars or administrators, to forestry and forest-related subjects from biology to earth sciences, economics, politics, administration or law. See the complete listing of Bullard Scholars from 1962 - the present. 

Monday, May 1, 2006

Invasive Plants in the News

HF research on invasive plants demonstrates critical evidence that a noxious alien weed causes ecological damage in the Garlic mustard invasionNortheast

Monday, May 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Identifying Types of Private Forest Ownership

Ecosystem-scale approaches to management in the eastern United States depend on the attitudes and behaviors of thousands of non-industrial private families and individuals whose ownership dominates landscapes. In Massachusetts, for example, it is estimated that the average ownership is 23 acres. Most ecosystem processes greatly exceed this very small average management unit. While there has been prior work on individual owner attitudes, there is little documented research exploring attitudes of owners towards cooperation at scales broader than their own properties.

Saturday, April 1, 2006

Harvard Forest Master's Student Receives Bowdoin Prize

MFS student, Edward Faison was awarded Harvard University's Bowdoin Prize for Graduate Essays in the Natural Sciences for 2005-2006, an annual prize given for a paper of literary merit on any subject in the natural sciences. His essay, entitled "Extraordinary Accounts of the Common Ragweed," discusses ragweed pollen's unique role as an indicator of major environmental shifts in the New England landscape during the past 10,000 years. 

Saturday, April 1, 2006

New Harvard Forest Publication: Land Use Change in North Carolina

In a recently released book, Harvard Forest researcher Robert McDonald co-authored a chapter on the causes and consequences of land-use change in the North Carolina Piedmont with D.L. Urban, E.S. Minor, and E.A. Treml. The project integrated studies of forest dynamics, conservation value (forest songbird communities), and ecosystem processes (watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry). As part of this modeling effort, they estimated the uncertainties due to errors in imagery and ground data, model selection, parameter estimation, and process error.

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